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To be successful in supporting people staff and organisations need to establish a good balance between what is important to and for a person.

In services, staff are often directed to ensure people are kept healthy and safe, in person centred thinking this is often referred to as being 'important for' someone. What is 'important to' the person and embraces the important people, places, possessions, rituals, routines, faith culture, interests, hobbies, work etc. which makes the person who they are.

This tool will help services

importantfor

  • To support the person in ways that makes sense to them.
  • To develop fuller and richer lives
  • To find ways of supporting the person to be healthy and safe

Link

A template (see graphic) for the important to/for  tool you will find on the website http://www.thinkandplan.com/ and here.

The short description of the method in the minibook person centred thinking you find here.

An explanation of the important to/ for tool and examples you can also find on the website of Helen Sanderson Associates

This tool helps paid staff or volunteers, think about their roles and responsibilities in supporting a  person by identifying 'core responsibilities'  i.e. what support staff must do, either because it is important to that person or it keeps them healthy and safe, where they may use 'Judgement and creativity' and 'not our responsibility' where staff should not become involved. 
This tool helps

  • Staff clarifies their roles and responsibilities and establish the best way to support the person.
  • Prevent services from becoming involved in decisions which are outside their responsibility
  • Develop creative and effective ways of supporting people


An example of how to use the doughnut to sort responsibilities you can find in the story of John.

Link

A template (see graphic) for the responsibilities tool you will find on the website http://www.thinkandplan.com/ and here.

The short description of the method in the minibook person centred thinking you find here.

An explanation of Responsibilities tool and examples you can also find on the website of Helen Sanderson Associates.

Literature

SANDERSON, Helen & GOODWIN, Gill (2007): Person Centred Thinking Stockport: HSA Press.http://www.personcentredplanning.eu/files/hsa_minibook_pcp.pdf

This tool helps to think about what kind of support a person wants and needs and what skills and characteristic a good support person should have. The goal is to get a good match between those who need support and those who offer (paid) support. This tool can be used to develop a “job description” and recruit paid staff or to think about natural, unpaid support in the community.

The tool uses four headings:

  1. support wanted and needed – What are the areas or activities where the person needs and wants support?
  2. skills needed – What are the skills that a support person needs to support the person by that activity
  3. personality characteristics needed  - What are personal characteristics of the support person that would make a good match with the task and the supported person? What qualities must they have? What would be good to have
  4. shared common interests – What are the things and activities the support person should be also excited about?

The most important part of this is the box where personality characteristics are recorded. 
A good match is very important for the quality of life for people who are dependent on others for support. It makes people more satisfied with the support they receive and the work they do. In consequence it reduces turn-over of staff.

Link

A template (see graphic) for the recruitment tool you will find on the website http://www.thinkandplan.com/ and here.

The short description of the method in the minibook person centred thinking you find here.

An explanation of the matching staff tool and examples you can also find on the website of Helen Sanderson Associates

Literature

SANDERSON, Helen & GOODWIN, Gill (2007): Person Centred Thinking Stockport: HSA Press.http://www.personcentredplanning.eu/files/hsa_minibook_pcp.pdf

Gives support staff information on how the person communicates with their behaviour as well as with words and provides information on what staff must do to support the person. There are two types.

  1. How we understand what the person is telling us
  2. How tell the person what we would like them to do

This tool helps

  • Staff understand what a person is saying with their behaviour
  • Respond to the persons behaviour when there is a discrepancy between words and behaviour
  • Understand how they best support the person
  • Understand how they need to communicate what they would like the person to do.

A template of the communication chart table you can download here.

Another template (see graphic) of the communication chart you will find on the websitehttp://www.thinkandplan.com/ and here.

The short description of the method in the minibook person centred thinking you find here.

An explanation of the communication chart tool and examples you can also find on the website of Helen Sanderson Associates.

Literature

SANDERSON, Helen & GOODWIN, Gill (2007): Person Centred Thinking Stockport: HSA Press.http://www.personcentredplanning.eu/files/hsa_minibook_pcp.pdf

This reflective tool can be used to think about what staff or others understand about a person and what needs to change.

The tool asks four questions:

  1. What have we tried?
  2. What have we learned?
  3. What are we pleased about?
  4. What are we concerned about?



This tool helps:
•    Staff to reflect on their understanding about a person
•    Promote understanding in a team meetings or supervision. 
•    Exploring issues more deeply.

Link

The short description of the method in the minibook person centred thinking you find here.

A template (see graphic) for the four and one question tool you will find on the websitehttp://www.thinkandplan.com/ and here.

An explanation of the 4 + 1 questions tool and examples you can also find on the website of Helen Sanderson Associates

Literature

SANDERSON, Helen & GOODWIN, Gill (2007): Person Centred Thinking Stockport: HSA Press.http://www.personcentredplanning.eu/files/hsa_minibook_pcp.pdf

Enables staff to record good information to enable them to understand the person and support them more effectively. It has the sections

 

This tool helps

  • If staff do not understand a particular issue in the person’s life.
  • Provide good information for communication charts.
  • Provide good information in daily records.

A template of the learning log you can download here.

Link

Another template (see graphic) for the learning log you will find on the website http://www.thinkandplan.com/ and here.

The short description of the method in the minibook person centred thinking you find here.

An explanation of the learning log and examples you can also find on the website of Helen Sanderson Associates

Literature

SANDERSON, Helen & GOODWIN, Gill (2007): Person Centred Thinking Stockport: HSA Press.http://www.personcentredplanning.eu/files/hsa_minibook_pcp.pdf

This little book of person centred thinking tools gives you an opportunity to start supporting people in ways that really matter to them. It offers practical ways to gather information and to start to set actions that make a real difference.

Download here.